Search for elusive sterile neutrino continues with improved high-energy muon neutrino reconstruction in IceCube

Neutrinos are tiny “ghostlike” particles that traverse long distances across the universe, interacting with matter only through the weak force. They come in three different types or “flavors”—electron, muon, and tau—and during their journey through the atmosphere and the Earth can transform from one flavor to another. This phenomenon, called neutrino oscillation, is a subject […]

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Measurement of atmospheric neutrino oscillation parameters using convolutional neural networks with high precision

As cosmic rays crash into the Earth’s atmosphere, air showers containing atmospheric muons and neutrinos are produced. The atmospheric neutrinos are then detected by DeepCore, a denser array of sensors in the center of the IceCube detector at the South Pole. Compared to the main IceCube detector, DeepCore is sensitive to neutrinos down to energies […]

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Joint search for candidate galactic PeVatrons using data from IceCube, HAWC

The origins of extremely energetic particles, called cosmic rays, continue to puzzle astronomers. Some of the highest energy cosmic ray protons can reach one million billion electronvolts (PeV) in energy, but the sources of these protons, or PeVatrons, have been difficult to pin down.  Cosmic rays accelerated by PeVatrons produce pions when interacting with surrounding […]

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Successful testing of over 10,000 photomultiplier tubes for IceCube Upgrade digital optical modules

At the South Pole, the cubic-kilometer-sized IceCube Neutrino Observatory searches for high-energy neutrinos of astrophysical origin. When a neutrino crashes into the ice, blue light is emitted and detected by some of IceCube’s 5,160 digital optical modules (DOMs) across 86 vertical cables (strings) embedded deep within the Antarctic ice. The IceCube Upgrade, an enhancement to […]

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IceCube search for neutrino decoherence from quantum gravity

The unification of quantum theory and gravitation remains one of the most outstanding challenges in fundamental physics today. One mystery is the quantum nature of spacetime—a fusion of the three dimensions of space and the fourth dimension of time—and whether it is subject to the randomness seen in other quantum theories, resulting in fluctuations at […]

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IceCube observes seven astrophysical tau neutrino candidates

Neutrinos are tiny, weakly interacting subatomic particles that can travel astronomical distances undisturbed. As such, they can be traced back to their sources, revealing the mysteries surrounding the cosmos. High-energy neutrinos that originate from the farthest reaches beyond our galaxy are called astrophysical neutrinos and are the main subject of study for the IceCube Neutrino […]

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Improving in-ice particle shower models for reconstruction of IceCube events

The IceCube neutrino detector, embedded in a cubic kilometer of Antarctic ice, searches for high-energy neutrinos from the farthest reaches of outer space. The pristine ice serves as a natural medium for detecting showers of secondary charged particles that result from many neutrino interaction types in the ice. Through a process called Cherenkov radiation, ultraviolet […]

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IceCube successfully extracts the lowest energy cosmic neutrinos in the southern sky

Since astrophysical neutrinos of high energy were first observed in 2013, the IceCube Neutrino Observatory at the South Pole has continued searching for their sources. So far, evidence of high-energy neutrino emission has been found from the blazar TXS 0506+056, the active galaxy NGC 1068, and most recently, the Milky Way. However, the neutrino streams, […]

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IceCube’s first citizen science project a success

Last year, the “Name that Neutrino” project was launched, which called on volunteers from the public to help classify signals from neutrinos—tiny, ghostlike particles—for the IceCube Neutrino Observatory at the South Pole. The project was hosted on Zooniverse, the largest web-based research platform that invites novices and science enthusiasts alike to contribute to ongoing research […]

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IceCube search for low-energy GeV neutrinos from gamma-ray bursts

As one of the most powerful classes of explosions in the universe, gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) have long been considered a possible astrophysical source of neutrinos—tiny “ghostlike” particles that travel through space and large amounts of matter unhindered. These high-energy neutrinos are of particular interest to the IceCube Neutrino Observatory, a gigaton-scale neutrino detector at the […]

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