Week 22 at the Pole

A relatively quiet week it was, last week at the Pole. As far as the IceCube detector goes, quiet is good. There are always regular maintenance tasks and occasional issues that require troubleshooting, but nothing that hinders its performance. The detector has maintained a very high uptime over its many years of operation. And that’s […]

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Week 21 at the Pole

Last week (well, on May 26), there was a rare super blood moon event—the coinciding of a supermoon, when the moon is at its closest to the Earth, and a blood moon, when the moon turns red as it enters Earth’s shadow during a lunar eclipse. The eclipse was only visible in parts of the […]

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IceCube looks for low-energy neutrinos from gravitational wave events

Ever since the first detection of gravitational waves by LIGO and Virgo, the IceCube Neutrino Observatory has been searching for neutrino counterparts to gravitational waves. Detecting both gravitational waves and neutrinos from the same source would be a groundbreaking step in multimessenger astronomy, the field that uses multiple kinds of cosmic messengers to see the […]

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Week 20 at the Pole

It was relatively quiet last week at the Pole. There were auroras, though, which gave winterover Martin a chance to take some great outdoor photographs. He walked out to the satellite dish domes with one of the communication engineers on station. This is Martin’s second stint as an IceCube winterover, but on his first time […]

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Week 19 at the Pole

It’s night at the South Pole—dark skies all the time, no sunlight for months—but that doesn’t mean there is no light. Last week, IceCube’s winterovers found clear skies with enough light from the stars and auroras overhead that they didn’t need to rely on their headlamps as they made their way to the IceCube Lab […]

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Week 18 at the Pole

Some people love to camp out in tents. But outside at the South Pole? Not sure how many takers there would be for that. Last week, however, intrepid IceCube winterover Josh willingly spent the night in a tent pitched outside the South Pole station’s main entrance. Looks like he rested peacefully, as shown below. Above, […]

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Week 17 at the Pole

The moon was out big time last week, and it was bright enough to allow the IceCube winterovers to turn off their headlamps a bit while they were working outside. Both the above and below images show Josh in the middle of removing the cover from the IceAct telescope that is on the roof of […]

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Celebrating IceCube’s first decade of discovery

It was the beginning of a grand experiment unlike anything the world had ever seen. Ten years ago today, the IceCube Neutrino Observatory fully opened its eyes for the first time. Over the course of the previous seven years, dozens of intrepid technicians, engineers, and scientists had traveled to the South Pole—one of the coldest, […]

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Week 16 at the Pole

Among all the healthy activities at the Pole lately is the “Climb to Mt. Everest” challenge, performed by climbing the stairs of the “beer can” (the vertical tower at the end of the station that connects the levels). The tower has 94 steps, and winterovers Josh and Martin are doing five beer cans a day, […]

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Week 15 at the Pole

The first auroras of the season are in! This is always such an exciting time, not only for those folks lucky enough to be at the Pole but also for those of us who only get the long-distance armchair experience. In IceCube winterover Martin’s selfie below, it almost looks as though he is somehow creating […]

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