IceCube sets strongest limits on galaxy clusters as potential neutrino sources

At present, one of the long-standing astronomical mysteries is the origin of cosmic rays, high-energy charged particles hurtling through space at the speed of light. Upon entering the atmosphere, they interact with atoms and produce an air shower of secondary particles, including nearly massless subatomic particles called neutrinos. Although very little is known about high-energy […]

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IceCube meets in Madison for its spring 2022 collaboration meeting

Last week, over 200 members of the IceCube community descended upon the University of Wisconsin–Madison for its fall collaboration meeting, which was hosted by the Wisconsin IceCube Particle Astrophysics Center (WIPAC). For the second time this year, the biannual collaboration meeting was held in person, with virtual offerings for those who could not attend. The […]

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Week 37 at the Pole

The early part of last week at the Pole was a little quiet, with just some troubleshooting stemming from a software crash. But then things picked up. It was the time of year when the flags around the ceremonial Pole are swapped out for fresh ones. These flags take quite a beating from the elements […]

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Week 36 at the Pole

IceCube’s winterovers spent some time last week on troubleshooting activities at the IceCube Lab, but they didn’t get there in the vehicle above. No one is going anywhere quickly in that truck—a “little bit” of digging out might be required first. Winterover Celas snapped that photo along with the other images below while hiking out […]

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Week 35 at the Pole

It was a fairly calm week at the Pole. The winterovers were again sent to the ICL to cover both IceAct telescopes. These telescopes are designed to detect Cherenkov light from cosmic rays in the atmosphere but had to be covered before a whiteout at the South Pole. The South Pole Art Gallery was graced […]

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Week 34 at the Pole

As the Antarctic winter draws to a close, our winterovers picked up some extra responsibility. Last week opened with a Zoom meeting between the current winterovers and the recruits for next year, during which Moreno and Celas shared their experiences, words of advice, and warnings about the South Pole delicacies. Later in the week, they […]

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The future of particle physics is also written from the South Pole

A month ago, the Seattle Community Summer Study Workshop—July 17-26, 2022, at the University of Washington—brought together over a thousand scientists in one of the final steps of the Particle Physics Community Planning Exercise. The meetings and accompanying white papers put the cherry on top of a period of collaborative work setting a vision for […]

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Week 33 at the Pole

The horizon at the South Pole continues to slowly brighten with every passing day. Unfortunately, the brownouts and blackouts that had occurred the prior week at the Pole also continued, but—again—all was brought back to normal with no major problems resulting. Also last week, IceCube winterover Moreno, in conjunction with Concordia Station, launched a radio-sounding […]

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Search for neutrino emission associated with LIGO/Virgo gravitational waves

Gravitational waves (GWs) are a signature for some of the most energetic phenomena in the universe, which cause ripples in space-time that travel at the speed of light. These events, spurred by massive accelerating objects, act as cosmic messengers that carry with them clues to their origins. They are also probable sources for highly energetic […]

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