First spectral search of monochromatic neutrino lines from dark matter annihilation and decay in IceCube

Despite making up roughly 85% of all matter in the universe, dark matter (DM) still remains an enigma to astronomers and physicists. One outstanding question is the microscopic nature of DM, and thus far, no experiment has been able to determine what it is made of.  To probe the nature of DM, scientists look for […]

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IceCube search for sub-TeV neutrino emission associated with LIGO/Virgo gravitational waves

Gravitational waves (GWs) are produced by some of the most extreme astrophysical phenomena, such as black hole and neutron star mergers. They have long been suspected as astrophysical sources of neutrinos, ghostlike cosmic messengers hurtling through space unimpeded. Thus far, common astrophysical sources of neutrinos and photons, as well as common sources of gravitational waves […]

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IceCube sets new limits on high-energy neutrino emission from supernovae

When a star reaches the end of its thermonuclear evolution, it explodes, giving rise to neutron stars and black holes. Called core-collapse supernovae (CCSNe), these explosions are triggered by the implosion of the dying star’s core. The ejecta from the CCSN can then interact with the dense circumstellar medium where charged particles can be accelerated. […]

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IceCube places constraints on neutrino emission from the brightest gamma-ray burst

On October 9th, 2022, an unusually bright pulse of high-energy radiation whizzed past Earth, captivating astronomers around the world. The luminous emission came from a gamma-ray burst (GRB), one of the most powerful classes of explosions in the universe. Named GRB 221009A, it triggered detectors at NASA’s Gamma-ray Burst Monitor and Large Area Telescope (both on […]

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IceCube’s first study on seasonal variations of atmospheric neutrinos

Atmospheric muons and neutrinos are the most abundant signals detected in IceCube. They are produced in cosmic-ray-induced air showers in the Earth’s atmosphere. Cosmic rays are high-energy protons and heavier nuclei traveling through space. When these cosmic rays reach Earth and collide with atoms in the atmosphere, they create an avalanche-like cascade of secondary particles […]

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Improved IceCube Upgrade optical module paves the way for IceCube-Gen2

The IceCube Neutrino Observatory, a cubic-kilometer-sized neutrino telescope, searches for high-energy neutrinos of astrophysical origin. Located at the geographic South Pole, IceCube consists of 5,160 digital optical modules (DOMs) across 86 vertical cables (strings) embedded deep within the Antarctic ice, as well as a surface array, IceTop, and a denser inner subdetector, DeepCore. When neutrinos […]

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IceCube reports first detection of candidate astrophysical tau neutrinos

The IceCube Collaboration has reported two candidate events for the final unobserved Standard Model cosmic messenger: astrophysical tau neutrinos. And one of these neutrino events, as with previous prominent particles detected by the IceCube Neutrino Observatory, has been given its own nickname.  Double Double, an event with a high probability of being produced by a […]

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IceCube’s latest search for neutrinos from fast radio bursts using cascades

The IceCube Neutrino Observatory, a one-of-a-kind detector operating at the Amundsen-Scott South Pole Station, searches for neutrinos—tiny, ghost-like particles that can travel extremely long distances unperturbed. Of particular interest to IceCube are astrophysical neutrinos, high-energy neutrinos originating from beyond our galaxy. Because they can travel straight distances, they can be traced back to their sources. […]

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Exploring the LHAASO ultra-high-energy gamma-ray sources for neutrinos

The origin of high-energy cosmic rays remains a long-standing mystery in particle astrophysics. However, it is thought that they are accelerated by galactic sources called PeVatrons, capable of accelerating particles to energies greater than 1 PeV. Some candidate galactic PeVatrons include pulsar wind nebulae (PWNe)—a type of nebula generated by strong winds of charged particles […]

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