Mining for transient astrophysical neutrino sources using IceCube cascades

Still to this day, the origins of cosmic rays—the astrophysical objects that produce and accelerate cosmic rays—remain to be identified. However, high-energy neutrinos, tiny, nearly massless particles, may be the key to solving this long-standing mystery.  At the South Pole, the IceCube Neutrino Observatory occupies a cubic kilometer of ice in search of high-energy neutrinos […]

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IceCube search for continuous and transient neutrino emission in the direction of real-time alerts

A cubic-kilometer array embedded in ice, the IceCube Neutrino Observatory detects cosmic messengers called neutrinos that can travel through space uninhibited. Of particular interest are high-energy astrophysical neutrinos, which can be traced back to their sources. IceCube issues real-time alerts to the public within minutes of the detection of a neutrino event with a high […]

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IceCube search for neutrino emission from extended sources in the galactic plane

The sources of cosmic rays—extremely energetic particles that rain down on Earth—have been a long-standing mystery in the field of astronomy. Cosmic-ray accelerators in the PeV energy range, known as PeVatrons, produce pions when the cosmic rays interact with their surroundings. These pions then decay into gamma rays and nearly massless particles called neutrinos. These […]

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IceCube search for correlation of high-energy neutrinos with active galactic nuclei and blazars

The IceCube Neutrino Observatory, a cubic-kilometer-sized telescope at the South Pole, has been issuing real-time alerts to the public within minutes of the detection of astrophysical, ghostlike particles called neutrinos. However, the sources of the astrophysical neutrinos detected by IceCube remain largely unknown.  One class of objects that are probable sources of astrophysical neutrinos are […]

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IceCube measurement of atmospheric neutrino mixing using improved DeepCore calibration, data processing

When cosmic rays strike Earth’s atmosphere, they produce air showers containing atmospheric muons and neutrinos—tiny, nearly massless particles—that rain down on Earth. The atmospheric neutrinos are then detected by the IceCube Neutrino Observatory at the South Pole. These atmospheric neutrinos come in three different flavors—electron, muon, and tau–and can become a different flavor or “oscillate” […]

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ICECAT-1, IceCube’s first event catalog of neutrino “track” alerts

Since 2016, the IceCube Neutrino Observatory—a detector buried in a cubic kilometer of Antarctic ice—has been issuing real-time alerts sent to the public within minutes of the detection of astrophysical, ghostlike particles called neutrinos. IceCube’s prompt observations are key in the emerging field of multimessenger astronomy where the combined measurements across the electromagnetic spectrum are […]

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First spectral search of monochromatic neutrino lines from dark matter annihilation and decay in IceCube

Despite making up roughly 85% of all matter in the universe, dark matter (DM) still remains an enigma to astronomers and physicists. One outstanding question is the microscopic nature of DM, and thus far, no experiment has been able to determine what it is made of.  To probe the nature of DM, scientists look for […]

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IceCube search for sub-TeV neutrino emission associated with LIGO/Virgo gravitational waves

Gravitational waves (GWs) are produced by some of the most extreme astrophysical phenomena, such as black hole and neutron star mergers. They have long been suspected as astrophysical sources of neutrinos, ghostlike cosmic messengers hurtling through space unimpeded. Thus far, common astrophysical sources of neutrinos and photons, as well as common sources of gravitational waves […]

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