University of Wisconsin-Madison

IceCube News Topic: Detector

NSF renews IceCube maintenance and operations contract

NSF renews IceCube maintenance and operations contract

The National Science Foundation today, March 30, 2016, announced that it has renewed a cooperative agreement with the University of Wisconsin–Madison to operate IceCube. The five-year, $35 million award entails the continued operation and management of the observatory located at NSF’s Amundsen-Scott South Pole Station. In 2013, the IceCube Collaboration reported the first detection of high-energy cosmic neutrinos, opening a new astronomical vista on the universe and on some of its most violent phenomena.


Five years since IceCube Neutrino Observatory completion

Five years since IceCube Neutrino Observatory completion

Decades ago, the aspiration to build a kilometer-scale neutrino detector at the South Pole seemed farfetched; today, we celebrate the 5-year anniversary of this incredible achievement. Shortly after 6 pm New Zealand time on December 18, 2010, the final sensor was lowered into the ice. This completed the decade-long construction effort that started with the design and fabrication of detector systems and concluded with the installation of the final string of sensors.


Drilling IceCube: a story of innovation, expertise and strong will

Drilling IceCube: a story of innovation, expertise and strong will

Building a cubic-kilometer telescope at the South Pole seemed a chimera even for some of those involved in the project. The goal was simple in words but seemingly impossible in practice: 86 boreholes, each 60 cm in diameter and 2,500 m deep, had to be drilled and instrumented in seven austral summer seasons. Safety was a must, fuel needed to be used cautiously and the South Pole environment was just unavoidable.


A new polar season for IceCube

A new polar season for IceCube

After a long winter, South Pole inhabitants are getting used to the sunlight again. Up north, a bunch of IceCubers are getting ready for their Antarctic adventure. For some of them, it’s all about the excitement of a first trip to Antarctica. For some others, it’s an almost annual appointment that makes their job a special one.


The start of the IC86-2014 physics run

The start of the IC86-2014 physics run

Around mid-May each year, new detector configurations are applied to IceCube to keep up its performance and to improve scientific results. Last week, on May 6, the IC86-2014 physics run was launched.


IceCube awarded the 2013 Breakthrough of the Year

IceCube awarded the 2013 Breakthrough of the Year

The IceCube project has been awarded the 2013 Breakthrough of the Year by the British magazine Physics World. The Antarctic observatory has been selected for making the first observation of cosmic neutrinos, but also for overcoming the many challenges of creating and operating a colossal detector deep under the ice at the South Pole.


Early IceCube Tests: Greenland, 1990

Early IceCube Tests: Greenland, 1990

Before there was IceCube, there was AMANDA, and before there was AMANDA, there were a couple people testing the idea for an in-ice neutrino detector in Greenland.


Southern works on Antarctica Telescope

Southern works on Antarctica Telescope

A Southern University physics team is helping to unlock the secrets of the universe as its research work comes to fruition at the South Pole.


Symmetry Breaking

Symmetry Breaking

The on-line version of Symmetry Magazine features the completion of the construction of the IceCube neutrino telescope.


The Polar Particle Hunter

The Polar Particle Hunter

IceCube Collaboration member Spencer Klein reflects on the final string of the South Pole detector.



The World's Coldest Physics lab

The World's Coldest Physics lab

An article on the Quantum of Knowledge blog details IceCube"s scale and purpose and outlines the importance of the neutrino as an astronomical messenger.


Underground Physics Lab

Underground Physics Lab

An audio interview with IceCube Collaborator and University of Alberta faculty Darren Grant.



Top 10 electronics stories of 2010

EE Times rates IceCube as one of the most top electronics stories, along with quantum film, solar cells, and other exciting discoveries.



South Pole Weekly Report, Dec. 19, 2010

South Pole Weekly Report, Dec. 19, 2010

Last week marked the successful completion of all major IceCube construction. The final hole of the IceCube array, was completed in the morning hours of December 18, and the final IceCube string was tied off on Saturday, December 18, around 1800h New Zealand time.