University of Wisconsin-Madison

#IceCubeAtHome

Want to explore and learn more about IceCube from the comfort of your own home? Check out the following resources and activities for you to engage in without leaving the house.


Join a call to the South Pole

On Wednesdays in March through May (and maybe beyond!), IceCube winterovers John Hardin and Yuya Makino will give a live presentation from the coldest, harshest place on Earth. After a 20-minute presentation introducing the science of IceCube and covering living and working at the South Pole, there will be time for you to ask your own questions! All ages are welcome.

Check our social media accounts for the exact time each week. On Wednesdays, join us on Zoom.

Plus, you can watch recordings of webcasts from previous weeks on our YouTube channel.



Read a comic book about penguins on an adventure

“Adventures with Rosie & Gibbs: The Lost Penguins” was created as a way to introduce astrophysics and Antarctic science to young kids. The first issue was published in March 2018 and the last one in May 2019.

You can read and download one issue at a time, or check out the special collected edition, which features extra content. Select issues are available in Chinese, Dutch, German, Italian, Swedish, and French, with more languages on the way.

Find them here.



Color with IceCube

Unleash your creative side by trying one of our IceCube-themed coloring pages.

So far, we have six options to choose from, including the IceCube Laboratory, a black hole, a blazar, and Rosie & Gibbs.

Find printable PDFs here.



Explore the universe in VR

If you happen to have access to an Oculus Rift headset, try our free virtual reality game! You’ll travel from the South Pole to outer space to find the origin of an astrophysical neutrino detected by IceCube.

Check it out here.



Take a tour of the IceCube Laboratory

Ever wonder what it looks like inside the IceCube Laboratory at the South Pole? Now you can see for yourself, thanks to 2018-19 IceCube winterover Benjamin Eberhardt.

As you watch this 360-degree video, you can use your arrow keys to look up, down, and all around. Watch it here.



Explore the South Pole Station via video

Our 2016 PolarTREC educator, Kate Miller, recorded a video tour of the Amundsen-Scott South Pole Station. Watch to find out what South Pole scientists do for fun, where they sleep, and how they work. Check it out here.



Watch our TED-Ed video

Get lost in the enchanting animations that TED-Ed has become known for…while also learning about IceCube! “Why Neutrinos Matter” gives a summary of “ghost” particles and how IceCube is working to detect them.

Check out the lesson on the TED-Ed website here.



Read the winning entries of our April poetry contest

April is National Poetry Month! In celebration, we asked our followers for poems about particle physics, astrophysics, neutrinos, multimessenger astronomy, and the South Pole. Throughout the month, we chose our favorites to illustrate and post on our social media.

You can read the winning entries on our Instagram highlight.



Read about life at the Pole

Did you know? We publish short articles on our website every week recapping the events of the previous week at the South Pole. Stunning photos from are winterovers are always included!

Read them all here.



Browse our photo galleries

We have nearly 30 photo albums on our website, ranging from detector construction to Antarctic landscapes.

Browse them any time here.